Parenting

I heart Valentine's Day

Call her a sap, but Cupid's arrow runs Karen through every time

A peony bouquet (Photo by vincen-t via Flickr)

On the cover of Toronto’s Metro this morning was the headline “Most hated holiday?” I had to laugh. I mean, I understand the critics who charge greeting card companies with creating a cash-grab holiday. Of course, restauranteurs, florists, lingerie stores and beauty counters are in on the gag, too. But, I’d argue that Cupid’s day doesn’t have to be about expensive meals and so-called romantic (and let’s be honest, cheesy) gifts.

In fact, my husband knows that a box of chocolates and bouquet of red roses won’t win him any points with me. I prefer peonies, though they are hard to come by in February, and lately these dark chocolate covered salted caramels from Whole Foods, but I digress. We celebrate Valentine’s Day in a slightly more modest – and I’d like to think – sincere fashion.

Past years we’ve treated ourselves to massages, which I consider a necessary health expense, not a luxury per se (we have health insurance that covers the cost so, granted, that has something to do with my perspective), we’ve walked around our favourite neighbourhoods, gone tobogganing, cooked extravagant meals at home and often just simply met in the middle of the day for cappuccinos.

A coffee date is our most likely Valentine’s Day event because it’s how we spent our first date, on Valentine’s Day, 11 years ago. Maybe that’s why this un-holiday has a soft spot in my heart. (No, its not just because I’m a caffeine junkie with a sweet tooth.) I’d argue that even if you don’t have a personal attachment to February 14, Valentine’s Day is a chance to spend a little extra time with your sweetheart and remind the rest of your loved ones that you do indeed love them. And stuff your face with chocolates. What’s so wrong with that?

How will you be spending Valentine’s Day? Tweet me @KarenRobock.

Photo by vincen-t via Flickr

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